how to

How to create your Own Style

Jared Acquaro

Unfortunately, no matter how well made the product is, without knowledgeable and experienced sales staff, the right clothes will have little chance ending up on the right body. – Alan Flusser

There are two main foundations of style; Color and Proportion. Once you learn which colors work with your complexion and which proportions flatter your body, you are half way to having your own natural style.

Once you learn which colors work with your complexion and which proportions flatter your body, you are half way to having your own natural style.

PROPORTIONS

When it comes to proportions, there is a kind of mindset that can be responsible for confusion while learning this, fashion.

We can not look towards fashion when it comes to learning proportions as they will be obscured and not proper.

Regardless of wide or skinny ties in fashion right now it all comes down to your own body and the widths involved.

For example; someone with broad shoulders would look towards a more wider tie rather than a skinny tie, to keep visual balance.

And so on with lapel widths and trouser hems. Visa Versa for a more slender man.

 

COLOR COMPLEXIONS

When it comes to color complexions, there are around six main types based on facial and hair color.

Brunet fair complexion, Auburn fair complexion, Grey ruddy complexion, Blonde pale complexion, Black dark complexion and Red fair complexion.

Within these complexions, there are two categories, contrast and muted.

If you have dark hair and light skin this is a “contrast” complexion, if your hair and skin tone is similar then you have a “muted” complexion.

Someone who has a contrast complexion should replicate it throughout their clothes. Wearing muted or monotone colors (Charcoal suit, Grey shirt, and Black tie) will wash out the wearer’s face when this should be the spotlight of any outfit.

Changing only the shirt from Grey to a White will create the contrast and therefore highlight the wearer’s face.

I will create two separate posts; one on color complexions and one on proportions, to give a more in-depth look into creating your own style.

 

 

 

 

Jared Acquaro

Director & Editor of A Poor Man’s Millions

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