ClothingUncategorized

100 Hands – Hand Made Shirts

Jared Acquaro1692 views

100-min

 

We all hear the best handmade shirts are from Italy (Naples) or England (Saville Row). Here in Melbourne, Australia we have Charles Edwards for the “best” bespoke shirts, but you pay ($500+AUD). So when I met Varvara out the front of cafe Gili in Florence one evening after a day at Pitti Uomo, I was intrigued, as a friend Miguel (Beyond Fabric) was just telling me about the amazing skills and quality of the craftsmanship from 100 Hands, the day before.

After a few skype calls and some photos, 4 weeks later my shirt arrived. I was excited to see what the label from Amsterdam (with an atelier out of India) could produce and straight away I noticed a better fit and flow with motion. For those with concerns even after a machine wash, it was still perfect!

From all the bespoke shirts I have seen (not too many) and hand made (a lot more than bespoke), I had never seen some much actual hand work in a shirt ever. Most “handmade” shirts would have all the long seams, cuffs, and collars stitched by machine and the rest by hand. With 100 hands, everything from the cutting to attaching the collars was done by hand.

 

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Heritage

With over 100 years of heritage in the textile industry and passion for obsessive craftsmanship. 100 hands offer a story with every handcrafted shirt it produces. Each shirt goes through skilled 100 hands before it reaches your hands. You not only receive a high quality handcrafted shirt, but you also get the story of each person that is woven into each part of the unique process.

The family of 100 Hands has a heritage of six generations in the textile industry. Hailing from the spinning industry, the family ventured into the shirt business two decades ago, making shirts for family and friends, as well as for several A-list celebrities in the United Kingdom, the United States, and the Netherlands.

In addition, the family has collaboration with several traditional Saville Row tailors and Haute Couture houses to offer these handmade shirts.

100Hands unite the past and present, blending the tradition with contemporary elegance.

 

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Each shirt is a work of art. Every procedure is carried with superior quality in mind to deliver finest product, process, and experience. The handwork ensures that every shirt is unique and has a character of its own.

Our designs are inspired by our Bespoke shirting experience and connections with the fashion enthusiasts within the luxury industry. Fabrics high-end Giza cotton, 3ply fabrics, and cashmere-cotton. The icing on the cake is the collection which is GOTS and Fair Trade certified but more importantly it uses cotton and silk fabrics woven by hand.

 

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Production

Your shirt takes birth over a period of 1.5 days where 100 hands of highly expert artisans take immense care to invisibly sew the body of the shirt with 25 stitches per inch. After a long and meticulous process, it is ready to be the finest of your wardrobe. The handwork ensures that every shirt of yours has a character of its own.

We differentiate ourselves by our craftsmanship (which is the soul of our shirts) and produce handcrafted shirts using the most traditional methods, many dating over 100 years.

Each shirt goes through the following process, amongst others:

Handmade patterns

Individually Hand Cut per shirt

Hand-matched patterns (finest around the world)

Hand sewn collar and cuff

Hand sewn sleeves

Hand (un)fused collar and cuffs

Signature threadless stitching mechanics

Hand sewn monograms

Hand sewn Australian Mother of Pearl buttons

Handcrafted pleated shoulders (optional)

Invisible stitching with 25 stitches per inch

Hand sewn shoulders

One of a kind Hand Sewn buttonhole

Finest 2-3mm French single seams

Although our whole process is handcrafted, we are most proud of the level of PRECISION we put into each shirt.

 

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Jared Acquaro
Director & Editor of A Poor Man's Millions

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